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A Hidden Mountain Range Found Under The Ocean Is Taller Than 4000 Feet!

A Hidden Mountain Range Found Under The Ocean Is Taller Than 4000 Feet!

A hidden mountain range has been discovered in a stunning revelation between Tasmania and Antarctica. These shockingly tall giants are sitting deep within the ocean at around 13, 100 feet below the surface and are also believed to be dormant volcanoes. Researchers on board a voyage by the Australian government agency, found this wonder in the Southern Ocean. They are rising more than 4000 feet from the ocean floor!

The race to explore the unseen has led to this amazing finding. High-resolution mapping and the vessel’s multibeam echosounder system helped in the discovery of thousands of feet deep. According to sources, four of the volcanic seamounts are new findings. Let’s dive in to look closely at this extraordinary discovery.

The Discovery: Unveiling the Hidden Giants

The Investigator,’ an Australian research vessel with modern technology, started on an expedition that resulted in an incredible geological find. CSIRO, the Australian government agency for scientific research, reported that the range has eight inactive volcanoes. These volcanic seamounts reach an incredible height of over 1,500 meters or about 4000 feet above the seafloor.

Image source: Science

Amid the fiercest ocean currents, they stand as a “spectacular chain of ancient seamounts.” These majestic guardians of the deep rest within a geographical marvel—the Southern Ocean. The ridge just west of the surveyed area tops in a dramatic slip into a valley over a 5249-foot-high cliff. Researcher Chris Yule confirmed the discovery and revealed the historical significance of these formations. The study suggested, that it would have taken shape around 20 million years ago.

“To our delight, we’ve discovered a spectacular chain of ancient seamounts. Four of them are new discoveries, and we filled in details on two seamounts and a fault line ridge partially mapped on a previous voyage. We now know the ridge, just west of the survey area, drops into a valley over a 1,600-metre-high cliff.”

Chris Yule, CSIRO geophysicist
Image source: Science week

Conclusion

As the final chapter of this deep-sea saga unfolds, the importance of the discovery is beyond measure. It shows an incredible step for scientific exploration while giving the essential values of conservation. The allure of the unexplored beckons, inspiring future scientists, explorers, and conservationists to continue probing the depths and protecting our planet’s history.

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